Use These Handpicked Sources To Become A Jewelry Appraiser

Image of a Jewelry Appraiser

A Collection of Web Pages About Becoming A Jewelry Appraiser

What is the Job Description of an Appraiser?

Appraisers comb over the fine details of art, jewelry, buildings, and other assets and use their training to estimate value. As an appraiser, it’ll…

Appraisers comb over the fine details of art, jewelry, buildings, and other assets and use their training to estimate value.

As an appraiser, it’ll be up to you to research, examine, and determine the worth of various items…More at http://learn.org

Qualifications of a Jewelry Appraiser

What Qualifications Should Credible Jewelry Appraisers Have?

Appraisers are part of a niche group of experts that form just a small, yet very critical aspect of the jewelry industry. Our skill sets derive from years

Our skill sets derive from years of industry related experience, ongoing studies involving new and advanced scientific procedures.

Extensive research of market fluctuations and fashion trends that affect production cost and material value, to intercommunication with larger research labs and organizations to keep up on legal guidelines for correct disclosures within the context of what is used in most circumstances as legal statements and documents…More at http://gemlab.com

JCRS – Jeweler/Appraiser Credentials

There is no federal or independent body setting qualifications for who may be a jeweler or a jewelry appraiser. Though these may sound like impressive titles, backed by study and expertise, literally anyone can hang out a shingle as a jeweler or an appraiser.

The accuracy of both the description and the valuation of your jewelry depends on the reliability of the jeweler/appraiser. In one investigation, TV reporters took a piece of jewelry to several jewelers for appraisal and received widely varying valuations…More at http://jcrs.com

Gemologist Qualifications

On October 20, 2006, the IRS unveiled transitional guidance that it will use to determine if an appraisal can be considered a “qualified appraisal” for purposes of substantiating the value of a non-cash charitable contribution.

The recently-passed Pension Protection Act of 2006 (Pub. L. No. 109-280, 120 Stat.780 (2006)) establishes new substantiation requirements for the allowance of deductions for non-cash charitable contributions of greater than $5,000…More at http://addeoappraisals.com