Think Like Your Customer And See The Changes You’ll Want To Make

Think Like Your Customer

What better way to understand your customers than to think like one? Imagine being able to know exactly how someone coming into your store feels or knowing in advance what a visitor to your website wants. With this knowledge, how could you help but make a sale?

When we understand our customers true desires it makes our business run almost effortlessly and customer satisfaction will greatly increase. But knowing exactly what a customer is thinking is not an easy job. How can you achieve a greater understanding of your customer?

1. Identify your customer. Your product or service appeals to a select group of people, so you first have to identify this group. What is their typical age, gender, likes, dislikes, buying habits, etc.? You might find out this information through

Forums/discussion groups/newsgroups

Special reports/consumer reports

Interviews

Surveys

2. Now that you have identified your customer, take a day or two to and act like him or her. For example:

If your research shows your customer is mainly concerned with cost, as you go through your day look at things from a cost point of view. Ask many questions. When you see an ad, ask yourself if the product is worth the price. Driving your car, ask yourself, “What is this trip costing me?”

If your research indicates that your customer is primarily concerned with high quality, then think of things that catch your attention in terms of quality. For example, you’re browsing a computer website and you see many brands.

Focus on the known brands and on the quality features and benefits.

Once you are in the habit of tuning in to your customers’ needs, you will be in “customer mode.” This mindset will be reflected in your advertisements, the way you present your product or service, and will positively impact your business.

The more you understand your customers’ desires, the easier it will be to achieve your business goals!

That’s The Way I See It!
Acey Gaspard
A Touch of Business.com